Medication Reminders

It can be difficult for some individuals who experience cognitive impairment to keep up with their medication schedule. Sticking closely to a medication schedule is important for a person’s overall health, and accidentally skipping a dose or taking too much can cause serious side effects. A skilled caregiver can provide assistance to your loved one by making sure that they’re getting the right medication, at the right dose, and at the right time each day. Our caregivers at PASCO can empower your loved one to live independently while still maintaining a medication schedule that meets their medical needs.

Who needs help with medication reminders?

Many people take prescription medications, and as we age, it’s not uncommon for people to take several medications every day. In fact, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey revealed that 80% of adults who are over age 60 had used prescription drugs within the last 30 days. That means most elderly adults are expected to maintain a routine for taking prescription drugs that can keep them healthy and strong.

People who can benefit from medication reminders include:

  • Elderly patients
  • People with dementia
  • People who have experienced trauma
  • Children with special needs
  • People with cognitive impairment
  • People who live alone

Many seniors take several medications each day, and one small mistake can mean serious consequences. Every prescription medication comes with its own dosage instructions that include when to take it, how often, and whether it should be take with food. Some medications also require the patient to avoid certain foods or other substances, and provide a list of side effects to look out for. When you’re sick, elderly or in pain, it’s hard to keep up with such a demanding routine.

On top of this, doctors frequently change their patients medications to better relieve symptoms and keep them in good health. With each new or altered prescription, patients are expected to update their schedule and keep up with an ever-changing routine. This is especially difficult for people who have cognitive conditions like dementia, and it can cause a lot of unneeded stress.

Why are medication reminders important?

Managing complex medication schedules can be difficult for older adults — especially for those who have cognitive delays. A qualified caregiver can assist your loved one by helping them to take their medications on time, at the right dosage, and under the right conditions. They can also keep track of your medication amounts, so they know when it’s time to get a refill. This will ensure that your loved one doesn’t overdose, skip a dose or take their medication incorrectly. Minor mistakes can cause serious side effects, and a caregiver can provide memory assistance and peace of mind.

The National Library of Medicine reported that elderly patients misused medications at an alarming frequency, posing significant risks to their overall health. In fact, 50% of respondents admitted that they skipped a dose or forgot to take it regularly, and 42.9% admitted that they’d confused their medications at least once, resulting in not taking the correct pill. Additionally, a smaller percentage of elderly patients responded that they’d accidentally taken more than the prescribed amount or mixed medications that they shouldn’t, resulting in a trip to the hospital for life-saving treatment.

Accidental misuse of medication can be scary— and even fatal — and that’s a risk your loved one shouldn’t have to take. Sometimes medication schedules are just too difficult to maintain, and a caregiver can help provide peace of mind for you or your loved one.

Who needs help with medication reminders?

Many people take prescription medications, and as we age, it’s not uncommon for people to take several medications every day. In fact, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey revealed that 80% of adults who are over age 60 had used prescription drugs within the last 30 days. That means most elderly adults are expected to maintain a routine for taking prescription drugs that can keep them healthy and strong.

Elderly patients

People with dementia

People who have experienced trauma

Children with special needs

People with cognitive impairment

People who live alone

Many seniors take several medications each day, and one small mistake can mean serious consequences. Every prescription medication comes with its own dosage instructions that include when to take it, how often, and whether it should be take with food. Some medications also require the patient to avoid certain foods or other substances, and provide a list of side effects to look out for. When you’re sick, elderly or in pain, it’s hard to keep up with such a demanding routine.

On top of this, doctors frequently change their patients medications to better relieve symptoms and keep them in good health. With each new or altered prescription, patients are expected to update their schedule and keep up with an ever-changing routine. This is especially difficult for people who have cognitive conditions like dementia, and it can cause a lot of unneeded stress.

Why are human caregivers better than technology when it comes to medication organization?

There are a variety of apps, devices and smart pill bottles on the market that are designed to make medication management easier. Unfortunately, technology doesn’t replace human caregivers, and the evidence supports this. A recent study found that smart pill bottles, even with bright flashing lights and reminder chimes, weren’t enough to encourage people to take their medications.

In addition to this, elderly people and those with dementia may find technology, apps and other devices overwhelming, heaping stress onto an already frustrating issue. Nothing compares to a human caregiver who can gently remind a loved one to take their medication on time and then watch to make sure they’ve completed the task. A caregiver can also watch for signs of harmful side effects and can properly store the medication where it belongs, whether it’s in the refrigerator or a dark shelf.

How PASCO can help with medication management

At PASCO, we support clients who want to live independently in their homes with the assistance of a chosen caregiver. We believe family members are the best caregivers for their loved ones, and have created the opportunity for family members to become paid caregivers. The Family Caregiver Program offers four different ways that family members can become caregivers, so they can do tasks like administer and provide medication reminders for their loved one with the oversight of a Registered Nurse. To learn more about our program and how you can get involved, contact us today.

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